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Jason Stellman 2018-05-29T22:34:57+00:00

Jason Stellman is a Southern California native and transplant to Seattle who wishes he still lived in Europe.

He is a gifted and provocative writer, thinker, and speaker who has grown accustomed to the disruption and fallout that result from questioning established plotlines and challenging inherited paradigms (especially his own).

Jason’s most recent book, Misfit Faith (Convergence/Random House, March 2017), explores spirituality as displayed by those whose lives are a mess, who don’t have their acts together, and who have every reason to quit believing but (for some reason) can’t.

On his popular weekly podcast, Drunk Ex-Pastors, Jason and his agnostic co-host sit down over drinks and discuss everything from religion to art and politics to pop culture, bringing their own unique camaraderie to issues both weighty and shallow.

Jason is a former pastor in Calvary Chapel (1992 – 2000) and the Presbyterian Church in America (2004 – 2012), and a former missionary to Uganda (1991 – 1992) and Hungary (1994 – 2000). He received his Masters of Divinity from Westminster Seminary California in 2004. In 2012, Jason stepped down from the ministry to embark on a career as a writer, speaker, mentor, and really bad Catholic (concerning that last one, he comforts himself by daily remembering Chesterton’s maxim that “Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly”).

Jason values things like rising early, eating whole foods, and “loving thy neighbor,” even though he rarely does any of them.

36. VATICAN’T (Catholicism Without All the Uplifting Parts): Week 8 — Humanity 2.0

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In this episode of Misfit Faith I discuss what Christianity might look like on the other side of our deconstruction and the death of our old idol-God, and I share how that my own journey has caused me to rethink what it means to be human. We hear a snippet from Nadia Bolz-Weber on the need to forgive a-holes, after which I take a listener’s question about the afterlife. I end the show with a rant about why outdated crap still exists in our supposedly advanced age.

By | August 20th, 2018|Categories: Misfit Faith, Uncategorized|0 Comments

35. VATICAN’T (Catholicism Without All the Uplifting Parts): Week 7 — The Absurdity of the Cross

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In this episode of Misfit Faith a turn my attention to “atonement theory,” suggesting that perhaps some things are better left ambiguous. We hear a snippet of Peter Rollins discussing Christianity and the Absurd, after which I answer a listener’s question about whether crises of faith are normal. I end the show by demonstrating how racist we all are.

By | August 6th, 2018|Categories: Misfit Faith, Uncategorized|0 Comments

34. VATICAN’T (Catholicism Without All the Uplifting Parts): Week 6 — The Dangers of an Early Easter

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In this episode of Misfit Faith I explore the space between crucifixion and resurrection, suggesting that we must exercise an atheistic faith in order to allow our old ideas sufficient time in the tomb before they re-emerge. I share a clip of a conversation with Barry Taylor, and end by sharing an example of people yelling at me. 

By | July 30th, 2018|Categories: Misfit Faith, Uncategorized|0 Comments

33. VATICAN’T (Catholicism Without All the Uplifting Parts): Week 5 — Divine Atheism

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On this episode of Misfit Faith I delve deeper into Jesus’ own confrontation with the void during his crucifixion, going as far as to suggest that in his cry of dereliction, God became an atheist. We hear a trinitarian argument from the Daily Show’s Trevor Noah (although I doubt he realized he was being trinitarian), after which I take another call about the afterlife. I end the show with a rant about a certain idiom in the English language that needs to be changed.

By | July 23rd, 2018|Categories: Misfit Faith, Uncategorized|0 Comments

32. VATICAN’T (Catholicism Without All the Uplifting Parts) – Week 4: The Death of God

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In this episode of Misfit Faith we look to the cross in order to discover exactly what “embracing the void” looks like (turns out it’s a real bummer). We hear from Peter Rollins about the message that Christianity frees us from the expectation of personal fulfillment, and I take a call about what happens after we die. I end the show with a call to all bros to quit being such douchebags.

By | July 18th, 2018|Categories: Misfit Faith, Uncategorized|0 Comments